FAQs

Q. What are the benefits of 1:1 learning devices?
Q. Do we take ownership at the end?
Q. Is the device protected online, at home and in school?
Q. Can I bring in a device we already have at home?
Q. How does the school propose to support those that do not take part?
Q. When does the direct debit start?
Q. What happens if a device gets damaged?
Q. What happens if a device is lost?
Q. I can buy one cheaper online – why should I use this scheme?
Q. What happens if I my financial circumstances change during the year/s?
Q. What steps will the school take to support parents during rollout and adoption?
Q. Does this mean that students will not be developing traditional, written skills?
Q. Does this mean that students will not have access to textbooks and other reference books?
Q. Will there be a limit on screen time for students?
Q. What restrictions/filtering systems will be in place at school?
Q. Will the same restrictions/ filtering systems be in place at home when students take these home?
Q. What happens if the charger is lost?
Q. Will children’s existing laptops, desktops and tablets, be they Microsoft Windows, Apple, Linux, Android or anything else with an up-to-date standards-compliant web browser such as Google Chrome or Safari, that can currently already participate in Tewkesbury School’s existing excellent remote learning system, be able to continue that participation from home and continue to submit work from home, after the start of the Chromebook scheme and for the foreseeable future?
Q. What happens if my child leaves prior to the donation schedule ending?


Q. What are the benefits of 1:1 learning devices?
A. Research findings indicate that teachers, students, and parents find devices a valuable addition to the classroom, noting increased student motivation, improved student-to-teacher and school-to-home interaction, and increased student-directed learning as benefits. In a comprehensive three year study, researchers found that students were more involved in their learning, their lessons were more in-depth, uses of technology increased, student creativity, collaboration, and communication increased, and parental involvement increased in the one-to-one initiative. More and more studies are being published reporting the myriad benefits of 1-2-1 devices and more will be reported over the coming decade.

Q. Do we take ownership at the end?
A. Yes, the Chromebook is yours to keep at the end of the donation schedule. It will also remain in the school management system until your child leaves us. Upon leaving your child should visit ICT Services to have the Chromebooks deprovisioned from the school’s management.

Q. Is the device protected online, at home and in school?
A. The student Chromebook is managed by Tewkesbury School until your child leaves. Use of the student Chromebook is monitored by the school while onsite – we use special software that detects any inappropriate use; the device may only be used for school-related activity.

Q. Can I bring in a device we already have at home?
A. Personal Chromebooks will be permitted to be brought from home for use in school under the following terms and conditions:
• Your Chromebook will be brought to school at your own risk and the school will not accept responsibility for any loss or damage.
• The school will be unable to support the device should any problems occur.

In order for us to provide a safe, managed and insured device we need it to be consistent with this scheme. Unfortunately the school cannot support or manage any other third party devices such as laptops, iPads, MacBooks etc will not be permitted to be used on site.

Q. How does the school propose to support those that do not take part or who don’t have the ability to pay and therefore cannot take the Chromebook home?
A. Students whose parents are not contributing for a device will still be able to check one out from the designated location during the school day. However, they will not be permitted to take this device home. We have facilities available to students after school and they are welcomed to use them for school work.

Q. When does the direct debit start?
A. The first direct debit will begin on Wednesday 1 September 2021, at which point the devices will have already been collected. Those paying monthly will continue to have payments taken on the first working day of each month.

Q. What happens if a device gets damaged?
A. The student bundle includes iCare for one, two or three years. The school will administer any claims and a repaired or replacement device will be issued to students.

*iCare only protects the device from accidental damage and if the device is stolen. Deliberate and or malicious damage will be charged and the insurance will not cover repairs.

Q. What happens if a device is lost?
A. Whilst theft is covered by the device’s insurance policy (with a crime reference number), loss is not.

Q. I can buy one cheaper online – why should I use this scheme?
A. Buying a device online will not include the necessary Chrome Management License which we use to manage the device on your behalf, to install apps and policies, and to provide the appropriate safety and security for your child. The bundle available through school also includes insurance cover for 1-3 years. We also feel that it is better for students to have access to the same device; this is why we are organising a school-based scheme.

Q. What happens if I my financial circumstances change during the year/s? ( I.e. Job loss, bereavement, terminal illness)
A. In this situation please contact the Birmingham eLearning Foundation, www.belf.org.uk or 0121 314 3407. As a Charity, BeLF aims to ensure no child is left out or left behind.

Q. What steps will the school take to support parents during rollout and adoption?
A. We will write to parents with advice regarding good practice around e-safety and device use. We are also providing at-home internet filtering included in the cost of the device.

Q. Does this mean that students will not be developing traditional, written skills?
A. No. Assessments will still be conducted using pen and paper, as this is how students will be assessed at GCSE and beyond. There will also be plenty of activities in lessons using pen and paper and the importance of good handwriting, good presentation and writing with speed and accuracy will be reinforced.

Q. Does this mean that students will not have access to textbooks and other reference books?
A. No. Individual departments will maintain similar levels of funding as to previous years, which means that they can still purchase textbooks and other books where these are appropriate.

Q. Will there be a limit on screen time for students?
A. Chromebooks are a tool for learning, not an activity in themselves. Good lessons involve a range of different activities both in and out of the classroom, incorporating discussion, group and individual work and, as mentioned above, work with pen and paper. It is definitely not the case that students will be spending all lesson, every lesson, on Chromebooks.

Q. What restrictions/filtering systems will be in place at school?
A. The schools use internet filtering systems, which will apply to the Chromebooks when they are onsite. A number of restrictions are also put in place through the Chromebooks’ integration with G Suite for Education.

Q. Will the same restrictions / filtering systems be in place at home when students take these home?
A. The Chromebook belongs to you and your children will be able to download other age appropriate apps for use outside of the school day.

Q. What happens if the charger is lost?
New genuine chargers are available for purchasing from the school.
*Please note that if you purchase your own charger without buying it through the school there is a chance that it will not be a genuine charger and therefore may void warranty and insurance.

Q. Will children’s existing laptops, desktops and tablets, be they Microsoft Windows, Apple, Linux, Android or anything else with an up-to-date standards-compliant web browser such as Google Chrome or Safari, that can currently already participate in Tewkesbury School’s existing excellent remote learning system, be able to continue that participation from home and continue to submit work from home, after the start of the Chromebook scheme and for the foreseeable future?
Pupils of Tewkesbury School will and always have been able to continue to access all remote learning via any device that has a web browser at home and submit work from home. No correspondence has been issued to the contrary from the School. The Chromebook project will not change this but will actually support many more families to do this, who may not have been able to do so. Chromebooks will also be able to be used in lessons to support learning.

Q. What happens if my child leaves prior to the donation schedule ending?
Remaining balances can be cleared at any time and iCare cover will continue for the entire length of the donation schedule.




Google & Privacy

Use of Children’s Data by Google

This following link gives information about GDPR and personal data information for Schools. Google Education accounts are treated differently to normal consumer IDs, and not advertising tracked etc: https://edu.google.com/intl/en_uk/k-12-solutions/privacy-security/?modal_active=none

Here is an extract from Google’s Chromebook Privacy and Security document: “When our systems do compile and collect data, it is only used after the information has been completely scrubbed for information about individual users. This data is used to improve the services we provide. For example if data shows that millions of people are visiting a webpage that is broken, that site would be moved lower in the search results. If they choose to, administrators can disable Chrome Sync and users can choose what information to sync. G Suite for Education users’ Chrome Sync data is not used to target ads to individual students.” A link to the full document is here: https://app.luminpdf.com/viewer/MC3ZEZ8unS7m2apMM

Here are extracts from G Suite for Education Privacy Notice: “Information we collect: A G Suite for Education account is a Google Account created and managed by a school for use by students and educators. When creating this account, the school may provide Google with certain personal information about its students and educators, which includes a user’s name, email address, and password in most cases, but could also include secondary email, phone, and address if the school chooses to provide that information.” “User personal information collected in the Core Services is used only to provide the Core Services. Google does not serve ads in the Core Services or use personal information collected in the Core Services for advertising purposes.”
A link to the full document is here: https://gsuite.google.com/intl/en-GB/terms/education_privacy.html

If were to try to anonymise each student by giving them a number instead of a username, in order for teachers to “translate” each student’s number back into their real name we would have to keep some sort of centralised directory of this data. As an organisation we use G Suite for the majority of our word processing and spreadsheets so this information would likely be stored in a Google Sheet anyway. Also, having students anonymised as a number would make it more challenging to filter and monitor all internet browsing activity which allows us to ensure that students are not able to reach harmful materials online.

Our teachers know the students in their class by name and using their names on their accounts makes our various systems easy to use. If students’ names were replaced by anonymised numbers, many of these systems would become borderline unusable. Teachers would have to refer to the directory mentioned above for every instance of registration, emailing, marking, assessment, reporting, safeguarding, etc. It would be very easy to get Student #03698 confused with Student #03689.

As children age they need to learn how best to represent themselves online, not only through social media but also in search of further employment. This is something we currently teach as part of our English curriculum. Dealing with students as a number instead of a name is unrealistic and not something they will be able to sustain as they move on to Sixth Form and then Higher Education.

Some systems, such as exam boards and UCAS will not accept anonymised student information.